Looking in the Mirror

Spiritual Revelations for those seeking Humanity in Humans ~~CordieB.

Archive for Observations

Indecisiveness

This poem was prompted by Simply Snickers.  The words for this week were: damp, decide, and droll.

Indecision by *moonmomma

Indecision by *moonmomma

Indecisiveness

Indecisiveness takes its toll
On the drollness and lightness of our soul
Made up minds lift the dread filled weight
lingering heavily on our fate

Indecision stunts our growth
though deciding we may loath
one must move through inconclusive’s brace
holding mind, body and spirit stuck in place…

till decisions can be made
life continues, low-keyed; afraid
knowing in the back of mind
choices must be made in time

Preventing  souls from moving free
intensifying fears of what may or may not be
lest we move from fear to flight
we may never see the light

Though decisions may be wrong
lack of choice only prolongs
mending of spirit and self torn apart
when in dire doubt, follow your heart

Written by CordieB.

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Spiritual Riddle – You may hate me or love me, but when it’s all said and done, you will definitely accept me. (By CordieB)

This is a reposting. . . with a little extra . . . I thought about this after reading Why Paisley’s, "An Ordinary Man."


You may try to escape me, but I will always be just a whisper ahead of you;  You do not truly understand that I mean you no harm.  I am your constant companion, through thick and thin, through triumphs and failures.

You and I are so closely woven, that not even the greatest love or lust can ever really permanently separate us; Our magnetism is so strong, that I will eventually find you and you will eventually find me.

You may desire to change me, to mold me into what you would have me to be.  There are times you may think you’ve suceeded.  However, in retrospect, you would only be fooling yourself;

My mysterious illusion may cause you to go through great lenghths in a futile attempt to find out exactly what I’m all about.

You may run in the opposite direction in an attempt to flee from me, but aha… I am still just a tad ahead of you!  In your haste, you will certainly slam right into me.

You may have even seen a glimpse of me in a distant world, but my charisma is such, that you really couldn’t tell if it was in fact me.  I saw your glimpse and awaited quietly for you to catch up.

I have cried for you and smiled for you.  You are all that I have.  In the realness of it all, I totally depend upon you, for without you I cease to exist. 

You may hate me, love me or fear me.  But usually, you treat me with total disregard.  I simply want you to embrace me.  However, when all is said and done, you will definitely accept me.

Who am I. Read the rest of this entry »

What I have learned (sometimes, the hard way), but not all that I have learned

I’ve always enjoyed reading lessons learned in life.  Below is a list of “What I I have Learned” quotes that I’ve collected and a few of my own.  I have learned that … you can always learn something new.   Also, I have learned that I can learn from anyone, and everyone has knowledge to share.   That being said, please add a “What I have Learned” quote to this list.   . . .

I’ve learned –
that you cannot make someone love you.
All you can do is
be someone who can be loved.
The rest is up to them.

I’ve learned –
that no matter how much I care,
some people just don’t care back.

I’ve learned –
that it takes years to build up trust,
and only seconds to destroy it.

I’ve learned –
that it’s not what you have in your life
but who you have in your life that counts.

I’ve learned –
that you can get by on charm
for about fifteen minutes.
After that, you’d better know something.
I’ve learned –
that you shouldn’t compare
yourself to the best others can do,
but to the best you can do.

I’ve learned –
that it’s not what happens to people
that’s important. It’s what they do about it.

I’ve learned –
that you can do something in an instant
that will give you heartache for life.

I’ve learned –
that no matter how thin you slice it,
there are always two sides.

I’ve learned –
that it’s taking me a long time
to become the person I want to be

I’ve learned –
that it’s a lot easier
to react than it is to think.

I’ve learned –
that you should always leave
loved ones with loving words.
It may be the last time you see them.

I’ve learned –
that you can keep going
long after you think you can’t.

I’ve learned –
that we are responsible for what we do,
no matter how we feel.

I’ve learned –
that either you control your attitude
or it controls you.

I’ve learned –
that regardless of how hot and steamy
a relationship is at first,
the passion fades and there had better be
something else to take its place.

I’ve learned –
that heroes are the people
who do what has to be done
when it needs to be done,
regardless of the consequences.

I’ve learned –
that learning to forgive takes practice.

I’ve learned –
that there are people who love you dearly,
but just don’t know how to show it.

I’ve learned –
that money is a lousy way of keeping score.

I’ve learned –
that my best friend and I can do anything
or nothing and have the best time.

I’ve learned –
that sometimes the people you expect
to kick you when you’re down
will be the ones to help you get back up.

I’ve learned –
that sometimes when I’m angry
I have the right to be angry,
but that doesn’t give me
the right to be cruel.

I’ve learned –
that true friendship continues to grow,
even over the longest distance.
Same goes for true love.

I’ve learned –
that just because someone
doesn’t love you the way you want
them to, it doesn’t mean they don’t
love you with all they have.

I’ve learned –
that maturity has more to do with
what types of experiences you’ve had
and what you’ve learned from them
and less to do with how many
birthdays you’ve celebrated..

I’ve learned –
that you should never tell a child
their dreams are unlikely or outlandish.
Few things are more humiliating, and what
a tragedy it would if they believed it..

I’ve learned –
that your family won’t always
be there for you. It may seem funny,
but people you aren’t related to
can take care of you and love you
and teach you to trust people again.
Families aren’t biological..

I’ve learned –
that no matter how good a friend is,
they’re going to hurt you
every once in a while
and you must forgive them for that.

I’ve learned –
that it isn’t always enough
to be forgiven by others.
Sometimes you have to learn
to forgive yourself.

I’ve learned –
that no matter how bad
your heart is broken
the world doesn’t stop for your grief.

I’ve learned –
that our background and circumstances
may have influenced who we are,
but we are responsible for who we become.

I’ve learned –
that sometimes when my friends fight,
I’m forced to choose sides
even when I don’t want to.

I’ve learned –
that just because two people argue,
it doesn’t mean they don’t love each other
And just because they don’t argue,
it doesn’t mean they do.

I’ve learned –
that sometimes you have to put
the individual ahead of their actions.

I’ve learned –
that we don’t have to change friends
if we understand that friends change.

I’ve learned –
that you shouldn’t be so
eager to find out a secret.
It could change your life forever.

I’ve learned –
that two people can look
at the exact same thing
and see something totally different.

I’ve learned –
that no matter how you try to protect
your children, they will eventually get hurt
and you will hurt in the process.

I’ve learned –
that there are many ways of falling
and staying in love.

I’ve learned –
that no matter the consequences,
those who are honest with themselves
get farther in life.

I’ve learned –
that no matter how many friends
you have, if you are their pillar
you will feel lonely and lost
at the times you need them most.

I’ve learned –
that your life can be changed
in a matter of hours
by people who don’t even know you.

I’ve learned –
that even when you think
you have no more to give,
when a friend cries out to you,
you will find the strength to help.

I’ve learned –
that writing, as well as talking,
can ease emotional pains.

I’ve learned –
that the paradigm we live in
is not all that is offered to us.

I’ve learned –
that credentials on the wall
do not make you a decent human being.

I’ve learned –
that the people you care most about in life
are taken from you too soon.

I’ve learned –
that although the word “love”
can have many different meanings,
it loses value when overly used.

I’ve learned –
that it’s hard to determine
where to draw the line
between being nice and
not hurting people’s feelings
and standing up for what you believe.

I’ve Learned. . .The badness of a movie is directly proportional to the number of
    helicopters in it.

I’ve Learned. . .Nobody is normal.

I’ve Learned. . .You will never find anybody who can give you a clear and compelling reason why we observe daylight-saving time.

I’ve Learned. . .People who feel the need to tell you that they have an excellent sense of humor are telling you that they have no sense of humor.

I’ve Learned. . .The most valuable function performed by the federal government is entertainment.

I’ve Learned. . .You should never say anything to a woman that even remotely suggests you think she’s pregnant unless you can see an actual baby emerging from her at that moment.

I’ve Learned. . .A penny saved is worthless.

I’ve Learned. . .The most powerful force in the universe is gossip.

I’ve Learned. . .The one thing that unites all human beings, regardless of age, gender, religion, economic status, or ethnic background, is that, deep down  inside, we all believe that we are above-average drivers.

I’ve Learned. . .There comes a time when you should stop expecting other people to make a big deal about your birthday. That time is age 11.

I’ve Learned. . .There is a very fine line between “hobby” and “mental illness.”

I’ve Learned. . .People who want to share their religious views with you almost never want you to share yours with them.

I’ve Learned. . .A person who is nice to you, but rude to the waiter, is not a nice person.

I’ve Learned. . .No matter what happens, somebody will find a way to take it too seriously.

I’ve Learned. . .When trouble arises and things look bad, there is always one individual who perceives a solution and is willing to take command. Very often,  that individual is crazy.

I’ve Learned. . .Your friends love you anyway.

I’ve Learned. . .Nobody cares if you can’t dance well. Just get up and dance.

I have Learned that . . .The best vision is not foresight or hindsight, but insight.

I’ve Learned to . . Live as if you will die today, and at the same time, Live as if you will live forever. What you do, and do not do, has infinite effects through infinity.

I’ve Learned . . . With every passing year I am more
convinced than ever of the truth of the popular Christian poem: “Only one life, ‘twil soon be past. Only
what’s done for Christ will last.”

I’ve learned….
That life is like a roll of toilet paper. The closer it gets to the end, the faster it goes.

I’ve learned….
That we should be glad God doesn’t give us everything we ask for.

I’ve learned….
That money doesn’t buy class.

I’ve learned….
That it’s those small daily happenings that make life so spectacular.

I’ve learned…
That under everyone’s hard shell is someone who wants to be appreciated and loved.

I’ve learned….
That the Lord didn’t do it all in one day. What makes me think I can?

I’ve learned….
That to ignore the facts does not change the facts.

I’ve learned….
That when you plan to get even with someone, you are only letting that person continue to hurt you.

I’ve learned….
That love, not time, heals all wounds.

I’ve learned….
That the easiest way for me to grow as a person is to surround myself with people smarter than I am.

I’ve learned….
That everyone you meet deserves to be greeted with a smile.

I’ve learned….
That there’s nothing sweeter than sleeping with your babies and feeling their breath on your cheeks.

I’ve learned…. That no one is perfect until you fall in love with them.

I’ve learned….
That life is tough, but I’m tougher.
I’ve learned….
That opportunities are never lost; someone will take the ones you miss.

I’ve learned….
That when you harbor bitterness, happiness will dock elsewhere.

I’ve learned….
That I wish I could have told my Mom that I love her one more time before she passed away.

I’ve learned….
That one should keep his words both soft and tender, because tomorrow he may have to eat them.

I’ve learned….
That a smile is an inexpensive way to improve your looks.

I’ve learned….
That I can’t choose how I feel, but I can choose what I do about it.

I’ve learned….
That when your newly born grandchild holds your little finger in his little fist, that you’re hooked for life.

I’ve learned….
That everyone wants to live on top of the mountain, but all the happiness and growth occurs while you’re climbing it.

I’ve learned …
That it is best to give advice in only two circumstances; when it is requested and when it is a life-threatening situation.

I’ve learned….
That the less time I have to work with, the more things I get done.

I’ve learned. . To not get into my children’s arguments with their friends.  The children will make up next day, but we parents will stay angry with each other for eternity.

Who am I – A Spiritual Riddle

I am a spiritual gift all beings have;

Some use me for good; some use me for evil;

Most have used me for good and evil throughout the course of their lives.

I can be destructive and I can be productive;

I put variety and interest into life;

I can enable you to move;

I can also immobilize you;

I can make the difference of you having abundance or nothing;

Who am I?

I am Free Will

~CordieB

All is Fair in Love and War – Or is it?

geeandcordie2.jpg
Issue n°161 : Convention of those wounded in love

General provisions: 
A – Whereas the saying “all is fair in love and war” is absolutely correct;
B – Whereas for war we have the Geneva Convention, approved on 22 August 1864, which provides for those wounded in the battle field, but until now no convention has been signed concerning those wounded in love, who are far greater in number;

It is hereby decreed that:

Article 1 – All lovers, of any sex, are alerted that love, besides being a blessing, is also something extremely dangerous, unpredictable and capable of causing serious damage.  Consequently, anyone planning to love should be aware that they are exposing their body and soul to various types of wounds, and that they shall not be able to blame their partner at any moment, since the risk is the same for both.

Article 2 – Once struck by a stray arrow fired from Cupid’s bow, they should immediately ask the archer to shoot the same arrow in the opposite direction, so as not to be afflicted by the wound known as “unrequited love”.  Should Cupid refuse to perform such a gesture, the Convention now being promulgated demands that the wounded partner remove the arrow from his/her heart and throw it in the garbage.  In order to guarantee this, those concerned should avoid telephone calls, messages over the Internet, sending flowers that are always returned, or each and every means of seduction, since these may yield results in the short run but always end up wrong after a while.  The Convention decrees that the wounded person should immediately seek the company of other people and try to control the obsessive thought: “this person is worth fighting for”.

Article 3 – If the wound is caused by third parties, in other words if the loved one has become interested in someone not in the script previously drafted, vengeance is expressly forbidden.  In this case, it is allowed to use tears until the eyes dry up, to punch walls or pillows, to insult the ex-partner in conversations with friends, to allege his/her complete lack of taste, but without offending their honor.  The Convention determines that the rule contained in Article 2 be applied: seek the company of other persons, preferably in places different from those frequented by the other party.

Article 4 – In the case of light wounds, herein classified as small treacheries, fulminating passions that are short-lived, passing sexual disinterest, the medicine called Pardon should be applied generously and quickly.  Once this medicine has been applied, one should never reconsider one’s decision, not even once, and the theme must be completely forgotten and never used as an argument in a fight or in a moment of hatred.

Article 5 – In all definitive wounds, also known as “breaking up”, the only medicine capable of having an effect is called Time.  It is no use seeking consolation from fortune-tellers (who always say that the lost lover will return), romantic books (which always have a happy ending), soap-operas on the television or other such things.  One should suffer intensely, completely avoiding drugs, tranquilizers and praying to saints.  Alcohol is only tolerated if kept to a maximum of two glasses of wine a day. 

Final determination : Those wounded in love, unlike those wounded in armed conflict, are neither victims nor torturers.  They chose something that is part of life, and so they have to accept both the agony and the ecstasy of their choice.

And those who have never been wounded in love will never be able to say: “I have lived”.  Because they haven’t.

From:  Warrior of the Light, Issue 161

No Small Dreams – Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.


Photo courtesy of DrewMyers and is licenced under Creative Commons

Man must evolve for all human conflict a method which rejects revenge, aggression and retaliation. The foundation of such a method is love.
Martin Luther King, Jr.

As I celebrated the life of Dr. King on yesterday, I remembered  seeing Dr. King’s picture on the front of The Richmond News Leader  as a child, upon his assasination.  Everyone was mourning and crying; some were angered.  I was confused.   I was 4 years old, and it was the first time in my life that I realized I was a black child.  Before this, I had no concept of a difference between black and white people.   I was a child.  Children have no prejudice, unless it is taught.  As God’s Children, we should all strive to be like children in our hearts, for such is the Kingdom of God. 

Yesterday, I also remembered the hopes and dreams of this man, who with love for humanity, purpose and vision, tapped into the conciousness of many Americans and people around the world.  Dr. King’s dreams for racial equality, was not his only dream.  Dr. King was a visionary, a warrior for peace, love, and just simply doing the right thing.  He was a true humanitarian, who spoke his truth, no matter what popular opinion held.  The article below written by Michael Eric Dyson, clearly gives us a broad array of Dr. King’s Dream of people creating and not destroying, working together and not against each other, loving and not hating. 

Peace, Love and Light to all Warriors of the Light in respect for Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. 
~CordieB.

No Small Dreams – By Michael Eric Dyson

As a literary figure, Martin Luther King, Jr., stands as possibly the greatest American rhetorician of the 20th century. As a citizen, his singular contributions to the legacy of American democracy helped this nation realize its political and moral aspirations to an arguably greater extent than any other figure. And while much of the literature about King portrays him as a dreamer intent on rhapsodically transforming America through eloquent speech and writing, in reality he was much more. He was a visionary activist whose disturbing words and courageous deeds cost him his life. It is unfortunate that we have largely frozen King in his “I Have a Dream” stage while neglecting the radical evolution of his later years. Perhaps by revisiting the impressive body of literature King left behind we can come to a deeper understanding of his thoughts and his abiding legacy.

One of the more misunderstood and underappreciated features of King’s mature thought is his skepticism about the earlier methods of social change that he advocated. For the first several years of his career, King was quite optimistic about the possibility that racial inequality could be solved through black struggle and white good will. In The Preacher King, Richard Lischer captures the civil rights leader’s early views in a revealing quotation by King:

“Maybe God has called us here to this hour. Not merely to free ourselves but to free all of our white brothers and save the soul of this nation–We will not ever allow this struggle to become so polarized that it becomes a struggle between black men and white men. We must see the tension in this nation between injustice and justice, between the forces of light and the forces of darkness.”

But during the last three years of his life, King questioned his own understanding of race relations. As King told journalist David Halberstam, “For years I labored with the idea of reforming the existing institutions of the society, a little change here, a little change there. Now I feel quite differently. I think you’ve got to have a reconstruction of the entire society, a revolution of values.” King also told Halberstam something that he argued in his last book, Trumpet of Conscience: that “most Americans are unconscious racists.” For King, this recognition was not a source of bitterness but a reason to revise his strategy. If one believed that whites basically desired to do the right thing, then a little moral persuasion was sufficient. But if one believed that whites had to be made to behave in the right way, one had to employ substantially more than moral reasoning.

King’s later views on racism were shaped by his move into northern communities in cities like Chicago. King’s open housing marches in Chicago were greeted with what he characterized as the most “hostile and hateful” demonstration of white racism he had ever witnessed, more violent even than Selma or Birmingham. David Garrow, in his book, Bearing the Cross, quotes King as saying that northern whites were practicing “psychological and spiritual genocide,” which was a stunning about-face on his earlier beliefs in the inherent goodness of whites. In Chicago, King openly admitted “I’m tired of marching for something that should have been mine at birth,” and he lamented the loss of America’s will to right its wrongs. In his book Why We Can’t Wait (1964), King made a remarkable statement:

“Our nation was born in genocide when it embraced the doctrine that the original American, the Indian, was an inferior race. Even before there were large numbers of Negroes on our shores, the scar of racial hatred had already disfigured colonial society. From the 16th century forward, blood flowed in battles over racial supremacy. We are perhaps the only nation which tried as a matter of national policy to wipe out its indigenous population.”

This is not the Martin Luther King, Jr., who is sentimentalized during each holiday celebration. This is certainly not the portrait of King painted by fast-food advertisements that encourage us to recall a man more interested in dreaming than doing, more interested in keeping the peace than bringing a sword.

If King’s later views on persistent, deeply entrenched racism capture his radical legacy, his views on economic inequality are equally challenging. By 1964, King had reached the conclusion that blacks faced “basic social and economic problems that require political reform.” But the vicious nature of northern ghetto poverty in particular convinced King that the best hope for America was the redistribution of wealth. In his 1967 presidential address to the Southern Christian Leadership Council (SCLC), entitled “The President’s Address to the Tenth Anniversary Convention” (included in Testament of Hope, a collection of King’s speeches edited by James Washington), King urged his colleagues to fight the problems of the ghetto by organizing their economic and political power. King implored his organization to develop a program that would compel the nation to have a guaranteed annual income and full employment, thus abolishing poverty, and he preached that “the Movement must address itself to the question of restructuring the whole of American society.” When such a question was raised, one was really “raising questions about the economic system, about a broader distribution of wealth,” and thus, one was “question[ing] the capitalistic economy.” These words mark a profound transformation in King’s thinking.

While King’s radical views on racism and economic inequality were disturbing to many, his views on the Vietnam War were virtually unconscionable to millions of Americans. Although King was initially hesitant about jumping into the fray, his strong antiwar activism proved just how morally and ideologically independent he was. According to Adam Fairclough’s book, To Redeem the Soul of America, by 1965 King had concluded that America’s policy on Vietnam had been, since 1945, “morally and politically wrong.” Despite his views, King’s public criticism of the war was hampered by two factors. First, his evolving radicalism called for an independence from mainstream politics that the bulk of his followers were unlikely to embrace. Second, his open criticism of foreign policy would alienate officials of the federal government on whom blacks depended to protect and extend their civil rights. This double-bind temporarily silenced King’s opposition to the war and made it nearly impossible for him to generate sympathy for antiwar activities in broad segments of the civil rights community, including his own Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

By 1967, King could no longer remain silent about Vietnam. His most famous statement of conscientious objection to the war was entitled A Time to Break Silence. That speech, contained in A Testament of Hope, was delivered at New York’s famed Riverside Church on April 4, 1967, exactly a year before his assassination. After noting the difficulty of “opposing [the] government’s policy, especially in a time of war,” King argued that Vietnam was stealing precious resources from domestic battles against economic suffering and contended that the “Vietnam War [was] an enemy of the poor.”

King’s assault on America as the “greatest purveyor of violence in the world today” elicited a predictably furious reaction from the White House. The news media was even harsher. In Symbols, the News Magazines and Martin Luther King, Richard Lentz notes that Time magazine had, early in King’s opposition to the war, characterized him as a “drawling bumpkin, so ignorant that he had not read a newspaper in years, who had wandered out of his native haunts and away from his natural calling.” Newsweek columnist Kenneth Crawford attacked King for his “demagoguery” and “reckless distortions of the facts.” The Washington Post said that King’s Riverside speech was a “grave injury” to the civil rights struggle and that King had “diminished his usefulness to this cause, to his country, and to his people.” The New York Times editorialized that King’s speech was a “fusing of two public problems that are distinct and separate” and that King had done a “disservice to both.”

Of course, King’s views would eventually win the day. But King’s willingness to risk his reputation within the civil rights community attests to his notable courage and his commitment to principles of justice and nonviolence. He refused to silence his conscience for the sake of gaining in the polls or winning broader popularity. In fact, as David Levering Lewis points out in King: A Critical Biography, in 1967, for the first time in nearly a decade, King’s name was left off the Gallup Poll’s list of the 10 most admired Americans.

It is easy to forget that King was only 39 years of age when he died. That he helped spark a racial revolution in American society before his assassination in Memphis is a testament to the power of his vision and the grandeur of his words. Not long before he died, King described how he would like to be remembered:

“I’d like someone to mention that day that Martin Luther King, Jr., tried to give his life serving others. I’d like somebody to say that day that Martin Luther King, Jr., tried to love somebody. l want you to be able to say that day that I did try to feed the hungry. I want you to be able to say that day that I did try in my life to clothe the naked. I want you to say on that day that I did try in my life to visit those who were in prison. And I want you to say that I tried to love and serve humanity.”

Michael Eric Dyson is an author and a professor of religious studies at DePaul University. His books include, among others, the recently released I May Not Get There With You: The True Martin Luther King, Jr., Race Rules: Navigating the Color Line, and Making Malcolm: The Myth and Meaning of Malcolm X.

Quotes of Dr. Martin Luther King
Dr. King’s I Have a Dream Speach (Audio)

Dr. King’s I Have a Dream Speach (Video and Text)

Sixth Deadly Sin, Envy

Sixth deadly sin: Envy
According to the dictionary: s.f., from the Latin Invidia. Mixture of pain and anger; feeling of displeasure about the prosperity and happiness of someone else; desire to have what others have.

For the Catholic Church: Against the Tenth Commandment (You shall not covet thy neighbor’s house). It appears for the first time in Genesis, in the story of Cain and his brother Abel.

In a Jewish parable: A disciple asks the rabbis about the passage in Genesis: “The Lord was pleased about Abel and his offer, whereas he was not pleased about Cain and his offer. Cain was exceedingly angry and his face fell. Then the Lord said to him: Why are you angry and why did your face fall?”

The rabbis answered:

“God should have asked Cain: Why are you angry? Was it because I did not accept your offering, or because I accepted the offering of your brother?”

Envy and ethics: For the scientist and researcher Dr. William M. Shelton, envy is a reaction provoked by losers, who seek to evade reality by hiding behind a crusade seeking to reinstate “moral values”, “noble ideas”, and “social justice”. The situation becomes dangerous when the school system begins to develop in the student the conditioning for despising all those who manage to be successful, always attributing any success to corruption, manipulation and moral degradation. As the pursuit of success is something inherent to the human condition, the students end up in a schizophrenic process of hating exactly that which would lead them to happiness, thereby increasing the anxiety crises, and reducing the capacity to innovate and improve society.
To read more about Envy and the other Seven Deadly Sins, visit Paul Coelho’s newsletter at, http://www.warriorofthelight.com/engl/ant.shtml

Peace, Light and Love . . .

CordieB