Looking in the Mirror

Spiritual Revelations for those seeking Humanity in Humans ~~CordieB.

Archive for Lying

Friday Flash 55 – Venom

Venom by !DagoDesign on Deviant Art

Venom by !DagoDesign on Deviant Art

Vicious words spit from
the venomous tongue
are far more deadly
than the bite of a
poisonous snake…
for at least
 the snake’s
bite
can be mutated
with
anti-venom
…yet…
the bite of the
poisonous tongue quickly,
and deliberately
kills
the spirit-
the venomous tongue
often leaves
 permanent damage
to the hearts of the multitude

~CordieB.

Submitted for the G-Man’s, AKA, Mr. Knowitall, Fabulous Friday Flash 55.

Quote for the Day:  Sticks and Stones may Break my Bones, but Words Hurt Long After the Initial Blow.  ~CordieB.

In reality, words can and often do hurt.  However, the spiritual individual is able to counter hurtful or false words with self knowledge and truth.  The spiritual individual will not allow the ego to manefest the hurtful words in his or her heart; for she or he knows the beauty in their being and the truth in their hearts.   Also, those who live by the spirit, will not spit hateful words to others or himself.  For it is the ego that constantly battles with the spirit to speak hurt, hatred or falsehood, in order to make the ego feel good about itself.   Remember when mom told you that kids teased you in order to make them feel big – well she was correct in her wisdom.  Some adults have not grown beyond their childhood and continue to tell lies or  say hurtful things simply to make themself look big by making others look small.  It is sad actually – the insecurities and fears of some people.   The next time you are tempted to say or speak a hurtful word, remind yourself that it is your ego and insecurities which tempt you to do so.  Beckon the love, truth and wisdom of your spirit to manifest itself.  When we practice walking and talking in the way of our core self (spirit),  and what we know to be true in our hearts, we will neither utter nor absorb hurtful and/or false words. 

~Peace, Light and Love…..CordieB.

The Spirit of Forgiveness in Relationships

 The Spirit of Forgiveness in Relationships.  The spirit of forgiveness is harnessed within the spirit of love and compassion–the love characteristic in how we are taught that God loves us; the love for which most of us love our children, our family, and even our friends.  I’m not speaking of ego-based love, which is usually associated with being “in love,” or “passionate love.”   I’m speaking of the unconditional love we usually reserve for those who we put beyond our egos.  If we can find it in our heart to delve for this compassionate loving spirit for all those we love, especially those we are “in love with,” we will find it impossible not to forgive our beloved when we perceive they have hurt us.
Let us drop the stones of revenge and try a new approach... forgiveness - by Anit@_M

Let us drop the stones of revenge and try a new approach... forgiveness - by Anit@_M

 Now just because we forgive someone does not mean that we should allow anyone to continually hurt us. It means that we release them from the anger, resentment, and bitterness usually associated with an unforgiving spirit. It means that we love them, in spite of….. We love them whether they are in our lives or out of our lives…just like the father loves the prodigal son.  In order to conjure the spirit of forgiveness, we must first conjure the spirit of godly love and compassion. The spirit of godly love (agape) “compassionate love” will get us much further in our relationships than the spirit of being in love (eros) “passionate love.” You see in the spirit of eros love, with it’s swirling emotions and drama, we don’t actually actively love our beloved; rather, we find a desperate emotional need for our beloved to love us.  Although, the spirit of eros in a relationship is important, as it makes the relationship, exciting and exhilarating, these feelings ALWAYS dissipate unless they are accompanied by the spirit of agape love.

So if there is something that you feel unforgiving about your beloved today, try to summon the spirit of agape love and harness compassion, not only for your beloved, but also for yourself.    This is the spirit that 50-year old anniversaries are based upon!  You might be surprised how much better you will feel about your beloved, but even more so, about yourself!

Quote for the Day:   "There is no love without forgiveness, and there is no forgiveness without love.” – Bryant H. McGill –

Later this week, I will give some ideas on harnessing the spirit of agape love….and I appreciate any input or comments you may have.  Until then…

Peace, Light and Love, CordieB.

The Truth, The Whole Truth and Nothing But the Truth

Picture from AP

Sister Shirley Buxton http://shirleybuxton.wordpress.com/ blogged recently on the confessions of Mrs. Marion Jones on her use of steroids. My father advised me at a very young age, “What a wicked web we weave, when first first we try to deceive.” I’m sure that Ms. Jone’s confessions sincere, and pray that the public will show her mercy.

One of the commentors, Anna, provided an insightful link to an essay on lying, which I would like to share.

The Ways We Lie – an essay by Stephanie Ericsson

 The bank called today, and I told them my deposit was in the mail, even though I hadn’t written a check yet. It’d been a rough day. The baby I’m pregnant with decided to do aerobics on my lungs for two hours, our three-year-old daughter painted the living-room couch with lipstick, the IRS put me onhold for an hour, and I was late to a business meeting because I was tired. Itold my client that traffic had been bad. When my partner came home, his haggard face told me his day hadn’t gone any better than mine, so when he asked, “How was your day?” I said, “Oh, fine,” knowing that one more straw might break his back. A friend called and wanted to take me to lunch. I said I was busy. Four lies in the course of a day, none of which I felt the least bit guilty about. We lie. We all do. We exaggerate, we minimize, we avoid confrontation, we spare people’s feelings, we conveniently forget, we keep secrets, we justify lying to the big-guy institutions. Like most people, I indulge in small falsehoods and still think of myself as an honest person. Sure I lie, but it doesn’t hurt anything. Or does it?I once tried going a whole week without telling alie, and it was paralyzing. I discovered that telling the truth all the time is nearly impossible. It means living with some serious consequences: The bank charges me $60 in overdraft fees, my partner keels overwhen I tell him about my travails, my client fires me for telling her I didn’t feel like being on time, and my friend takes it personally when I say I’m not hungry. There must be some merit to lying. But if I justify lying, what makes me any different from slick politicians or the corporate robbers who raided the S&.L industry? Saying it’s okay to lie one way and not another is hedging. I cannot seem to escape the voice deep inside me that tells me: When someone lies,someone loses. What far-reaching consequences will I, or others, pay as a result of my lie? Will someone’s trust be destroyed? Will someone else pay my penance because I ducked out? We must consider the meaning of our actions. Deception, lies, capital crimes, and misdemeanors all carry meanings. Webster’s definition of lie is specific: 1. : a false statement or action especially made with the intent to deceive; 2. : anything that gives or is meant to give a false impression. A definition like this implies that there are many, many ways to tell a lie. Here are just a few.

The White Lie

A man who won’t lie to a woman has very little consideration for her feelings. — Bergen Evans

The white lie assumes that the truth will cause more damage than a simple, harmless untruth. Telling a friend he looks great when he looks like hell can be based on a decision that the friend needs a compliment more than a frank opinion. But, in effect, it is the liar deciding what is best for the lied to. Ultimately, it is a vote of no confidence. It is an act of subtle arrogance for anyone to decide what is best for someone else. Yet not all circumstances are quite so cut-and-dried. Take, for instance, the sergeant in Vietnam who knew one of his men was killed in action but listed him as missing so that the man’s family would receive indefinite compensation instead of the lump-sum pittance the military gives widows and children. His intent was honorable. Yet for twenty years this family kept their hopes alive, unable to move on to a new life.

Facades Et tu, Brute? —Caesar

We all put up facades to one degree or another. When I put on a suit to go to see a client, I feel as though I am putting on another face, obeying the expectation that serious businesspeople wear suits rather than sweatpants. But I’m a writer. Normally, I get up, get the kid off to school, and sit at my computer in my pajamas until four in the afternoon. When I answer the phone, the caller thinks I’m wearing a suit (though the UPS man knows better). But facades can be destructive because they are used to seduce others into an illusion. For instance, I recently realized that a former friend was a liar. He presented himself with all the right looks and the right words and offered lots of new consciousness theories, fabulous books to read, and fascinating insights.Then I did some business with him, and the time came for him to pay me. He turned out to be all talk and no walk. I heard a plethora of reasonable excuses, including in-depth descriptions of the big break around the corner. In six months of work, I saw less than a hundred bucks. When I confronted him, he raised both eyebrows and tried to convince-me that I’d heard him wrong, that he’d made no commitment to me. A simple investigation into his past revealed a crowded graveyard of disenchanted former friends.

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