Looking in the Mirror

Spiritual Revelations for those seeking Humanity in Humans ~~CordieB.

Archive for Justice

The Shadow of Human Nature


http://biewi.deviantart.com/art/The-Shadow-Demon-13541045

Excerpted from The Book of Secrets, Deepak Chopra.

In 1971, students at Stanford University were asked to volunteer for an unusual experiment in role playing. One group of students was to pretend they were prison guards in charge of another group who pretended to be prisoners.  Although it was understood that this was make-believe, a jail setting was provided, and the two groups lived together for the duration of the experiment.  According to the plan, everyone would play their roles for two weeks, but after only six days the prison experiment had to be terminated. The reason? The boys, chosen for their mental health and moral values turned into sadistic, out-of-control guards on the one hand and depressed victims of exorbitant stress on the other. The professors conducting the experiment were shocked but couldn’t deny what had occurred. The lead researcher, Philip Zimbardo, wrote: "My guards repeatedly stripped their prisoners naked, hooded them, chained them, denied them food or bedding privileges, put them into solitary confinement, and made them clean toilet bowls with their bare hands." Those who didn’t descend to such atrocious behavior did nothing to stop the ones who did. (The parallel with infamous acts by American prison guards in Iraq in 2004 prompted Zimbardo to bring the Stanford experiment back to light after more than thirty years.) There was no extreme to which the student guards would not resort short of outright physical torture, Zimbardo mournful recalls, "As the boredom of their job increased, they began using the prisoners as their playthings, devising ever more humiliating and degrading games for them to play. Over time, these amusements took a sexual turn, such as having the prisoners simulate sodomy on each other. Once aware of such deviant behavior, I closed down the Stanford prision."

Where did this runaway abuse come from? For comforts sake, we usually say that it exists in a few "bad" apples," but the Stanford experiment suggests something more disturbing: Evil exists in everyone as a shadow, for the person is a counter to the shadow of evil, of course, and if we return to our list of shaping forces on consciousness, each person would exhibit a different map of influences. But if you are fortunate enough to have made choices on the good side of the equation, you must still acknowledge that the shadow exist in you somewhere.

The shadow was formed by the same everyday situations that shape our consciousness, and it is released by new situations that parallel them. If you were abused as a child, being around children can bring up those old memories. The Stanford experimenters devised a list of conditions that cause people to do things we’d call evil, or at the very least alien to our true selves.

For further reading, go to  Evil is Not your Enemy, Part I or Evil is not your Enemy Part II

Have a super weekened!

Sweet Revenge Turned to Eternal Regret

Troy Anthony Davis, Execution Stayed on Tuesday by Supreme Court
Troy Anthony Davis, Execution Stayed on Tuesday by U. S. Supreme Court, Let Us Pray Justice Prevails!

Sweet Revenge Turned to Eternal Regret

To the dismal chambers I watched him walk
His breath so shallow; he could not talk
I gazed into his coal, cold black eyes
He’d finally face well deserving demise . . .
For killing the man I loved so much . . .
..the wife I can no longer see, no longer touch
…the child who brought all my earthly joy banished
Due to an evil man; soon rightfully before my eyes vanquished
I felt my blood flow warmly through my veins with sweet revenge
Closure! My love one’s death finally avenged . . .
 . . . . . . .
Two years have passed since the revenged death ejection
Of the man convicted solely on witness recollection
Seems evidence proves the man who walked the mile
Was not the man who stole my joy; my love, my smile
With hatred, I watched an innocent man die in vain
Funny, his death never brought closure or eased my pain
I still recall that young man’s mother’s scream
Agony in heartbroken eyes, such as I’d never seen
The pain of unjust reality literally took her breath
When her innocent son was sentenced to death
Her agony leaves me feeling numb, emotionally wrecked
Sweet revenge has turned into eternal regret

~By CordieB

Fellow writer, Paisly has taken on a brave effort to bring our attention to the many executions that have taken place and continues to take place in the United States in which the evidence is based soley on eyewitness testimony, cohersed testimony, and false evidence; many, many of which are later proven by DNA evidence to have been wrongly accused.  The statistics are staggering.  Statistics show for every seven executions, one Death Row inmate has been exonerated.   Although guilty individuals may receive stays; it takes extreme evidence to the contrary to be "exonerated."  This figure will increase, as more and more people are convicted of capital crimes, proponents push for speedier executions, and legal help becomes less and less available for those who are accused of committing capital crimes.

Like Paisley, I have been quiet to this complicated issue we face; as it has never really effected me personally.  However, as a human being; a person who speaks and writes of unity, love, and freedom; I can no longer sit still without speaking out.   As a free nation, I feel it is barbaric that we, the Home of the Brave, Land of the Free, could actually be putting innocent men to death.   Also, like Paisley: 

"i believe the only real entitlement we as humans can lay claim to at birth,, is a little something called common sense..  and as i employ mine,,  it becomes increasingly impossible for me not to realize that given the right set of circumstances,,  it could (and very well might some day) be me,, for which they come….."

 

Deep Reflections – If I could choose any gift, I would give you back yourself

 I was inclined to repost this today after reading Paisley’s blog entries entitled, Remember the Monkeys and and I wait .  So often in life we wander with goals and ambitions – that really are expectations handed down to us by society, family, associates, etc.   So I ask again . . .Who are we really . . .?Peace, Light and Love, CordieB. 
Photo courtesy of  joka2000 and is licensed under the creative commons

I read a poem entitled "Helen" today.   I thought to myself, what a beautiful poem.   Of all the gifts that Helen’s husband could bestow upon her, even if he had an infinite store, the one that he knew was most valuable was to" give her back herself."   He goes on to say, he would also provide his true self, if only he could find where it lay hidden and proved kind.  

And You, Helen, By Edward Thomas

And you, Helen, what should I give you?
So many things I would give you
Had I an infinite great store
Offered me and I stood before
To Choose. I would give you youth,
All kinds of loveliness and truth,
A clear eye as good as mine,
Lands, waters, flowers, wine,
As many children as your heart
Might wish for, a far better art
Than mine can be, all you have lost
upon travelling waters tossed,
Or given to me. If I could choose
Freely in that great treasure-house
anything from any shelf,
I would give you back yourself,
And power to discriminate
What you want and want it not too late,
Many fair days free from care
And a heart to enjoy both foul and fair,
And myself, too, if I could find
Where it lay hidden and it proved kind.

As romantic as this poem is, I ponder, can anyone ever really take someone’s self away; let alone give it back?  Or was Helen’s true self lost by chance, by her daily living?  Was Helen even aware of her true identity?   Did Helen loose herself once she was born?  Was Helen born into a society, much like today, whereas it was almost impossible for her to really ever be herself?    Do we instintively know good from bad?   Do we intinsively know right from wrong?   The poet, Helen’s husband, questioned whether he could ever find his true good self because it was hidden.   Do we instintively know that chocolate taste good? Do we instinctively wear our hair long, or short, or are all these conditions which have been handed to us by society, family, the world–our environment?   How does one get one’s true self back?  To accomplish this state, do we not have to relinquish all preconceptions, judgements, predjustices, ideas, ideals and all we were taught and exposed to from the day we were born, perhaps even before that time?

Today, I also read another poem and/or prayer (depending on who you are is how you will interpret it) by Rahul at: http://insearchofi.blogspot.com/2007/07/o-lord_07.html :

Oh Lord – By Rahul

Take away my fears
They scare my simplicity

Take away my obsessions
They scorch my soul

Take away my ambitions
They push me around

Take away my comfort
It makes me slothful

Take everything away
And give me back myself

Give me back my emptiness…

Now, wasn’t that just awsome!  I truly had never thought about regaining my true self to that degree!  Almost everything we are is a reflection of something else!  Once we take away everything, what are we truly left with?    Rahul’s blog reads at the top, "O Absolute energy! O Ultimate consciousness! Grant me the fearlessness to be myself.  

What a wonderful, blessed prayer!

So inspired by these writers, I decided to write my own poem today. 

_______

Who Am I

Everyone needs something

No matter who we are or how we think

No one can live without something . . .

Be it love, bread, air or water to drink.

Everyone’s a slave to something

But the choice is very clear

We can choose to what and whom we lend Ourselves …

So often in life, our choices root from fear;

For everthing we choose to let go

Another choice is sure to follow;

Jesus said, Blessed is the poor in spirit,

He knew that it is a blessing to truly be worryless; 

To know that our Creator provides all of it…

He knew to have an unburdened spirit is the key to life beyond

The fallacies and mailadies, that plague us for so long.

To not worry about not having enough or having too much;

To truly be one with God and one’s-self is –To Be– Free– in-touch;

For, unless we can let go all cares, ambitions, hatred, external comforts, or anything . . .

We are merely partly slaves to ourselves and partly slaves to something. . .

What is it that you will be a slave to? . . .

That is the gift of Free Will God has given you . . .

So you feel someone or something has stolen the gleams

of Life from your eyes and invaded your dreams?

Only God can truely erase your true nature . . .

Which was within you from the begining; no need to mature. . .

Your Creator has given you paramount choices; Free Will.  

But that’s only a fraction of God’s wonderment, still.

A curse if used in evil,  A blessing if used to inspire. . .

But if regaining your true self is truly your desire,

To regain, reveal, and be your real true self,

You must be willing to let go of every negative, unloving else.

Release imbedded pride, judgements, illusions, lies, anger, fears, hatred, prejudice and preconception

For God’s love is your Alpha, Omega, Beginning and End, your true self, your Heaven

 

 

 ~Good Friday to everyone.  It is through the teachings and love of Jesus Christ that I am able to realize the God (Goodness) within myself and the goodness in everyone of God’s creations; and know that our Creator provides all; Created all; and we originated in Him. 

Peace, Light and Love . . . ~CordieB.

Senator Obama! Change we can Believe In!

 

The journey will be difficult. The road will be long. I face this challenge with profound humility, and knowledge of my own limitations. But I also face it with limitless faith in the capacity of the American people. Because if we are willing to work for it, and fight for it, and believe in it, then I am absolutely certain that generations from now, we will be able to look back and tell our children that this was the moment when we began to provide care for the sick and good jobs to the jobless; this was the moment when the rise of the oceans began to slow and our planet began to heal; this was the moment when we ended a war and secured our nation and restored our image as the last, best hope on Earth. This was the moment – this was the time – when we came together to remake this great nation so that it may always reflect our very best selves, and our highest ideals. Thank you, God Bless you, and may God Bless the United States of America.

Abbreviated Remarks of Senator , Democrat Nominee Barack Obama<

Final Primary Night
Tuesday, June 3rd, 2008
St. Paul, Minnesota

As Prepared for Delivery

Tonight, after fifty-four hard-fought contests, our primary season has finally come to an end.

Sixteen months have passed since we first stood together on the steps of the Old State Capitol in Springfield, Illinois. Thousands of miles have been traveled. Millions of voices have been heard. And because of what you said – because you decided that change must come to Washington; because you believed that this year must be different than all the rest; because you chose to listen not to your doubts or your fears but to your greatest hopes and highest aspirations, tonight we mark the end of one historic journey with the beginning of another – a journey that will bring a new and better day to America. Tonight, I can stand before you and say that I will be the Democratic nominee for President of the United States.

 

I want to thank every American who stood with us over the course of this campaign – through the good days and the bad; from the snows of Cedar Rapids to the sunshine of Sioux Falls. And tonight I also want to thank the men and woman who took this journey with me as fellow candidates for President.

 

At this defining moment for our nation, we should be proud that our party put forth one of the most talented, qualified field of individuals ever to run for this office. I have not just competed with them as rivals, I have learned from them as friends, as public servants, and as patriots who love America and are willing to work tirelessly to make this country better. They are leaders of this party, and leaders that America will turn to for years to come.

 

That is particularly true for the candidate who has traveled further on this journey than anyone else. Senator Hillary Clinton has made history in this campaign not just because she’s a woman who has done what no woman has done before, but because she’s a leader who inspires millions of Americans with her strength, her courage, and her commitment to the causes that brought us here tonight.

 

We’ve certainly had our differences over the last sixteen months. But as someone who’s shared a stage with her many times, I can tell you that what gets Hillary Clinton up in the morning – even in the face of tough odds – is exactly what sent her and Bill Clinton to sign up for their first campaign in Texas all those years ago; what sent her to work at the Children’s Defense Fund and made her fight for health care as First Lady; what led her to the United States Senate and fueled her barrier-breaking campaign for the presidency – an unyielding desire to improve the lives of ordinary Americans, no matter how difficult the fight may be. And you can rest assured that when we finally win the battle for universal health care in this country, she will be central to that victory. When we transform our energy policy and lift our children out of poverty, it will be because she worked to help make it happen. Our party and our country are better off because of her, and I am a better candidate for having had the honor to compete with Hillary Rodham Clinton.

 

There are those who say that this primary has somehow left us weaker and more divided. Well I say that because of this primary, there are millions of Americans who have cast their ballot for the very first time. There are Independents and Republicans who understand that this election isn’t just about the party in charge of Washington, it’s about the need to change Washington. There are young people, and African-Americans, and Latinos, and women of all ages who have voted in numbers that have broken records and inspired a nation.

 

All of you chose to support a candidate you believe in deeply. But at the end of the day, we aren’t the reason you came out and waited in lines that stretched block after block to make your voice heard. You didn’t do that because of me or Senator Clinton or anyone else. You did it because you know in your hearts that at this moment – a moment that will define a generation – we cannot afford to keep doing what we’ve been doing. We owe our children a better future. We owe our country a better future. And for all those who dream of that future tonight, I say – let us begin the work together. Let us unite in common effort to chart a new course for America.

 

In just a few short months, the Republican Party will arrive in St. Paul with a very different agenda. They will come here to nominate John McCain, a man who has served this country heroically. I honor that service, and I respect his many accomplishments, even if he chooses to deny mine. My differences with him are not personal; they are with the policies he has proposed in this campaign.

 

Because while John McCain can legitimately tout moments of independence from his party in the past, such independence has not been the hallmark of his presidential campaign.

 

It’s not change when John McCain decided to stand with George Bush ninety-five percent of the time, as he did in the Senate last year.

 

It’s not change when he offers four more years of Bush economic policies that have failed to create well-paying jobs, or insure our workers, or help Americans afford the skyrocketing cost of college – policies that have lowered the real incomes of the average American family, widened the gap between Wall Street and Main Street, and left our children with a mountain of debt.

 

And it’s not change when he promises to continue a policy in Iraq that asks everything of our brave men and women in uniform and nothing of Iraqi politicians – a policy where all we look for are reasons to stay in Iraq, while we spend billions of dollars a month on a war that isn’t making the American people any safer.

 

So I’ll say this – there are many words to describe John McCain’s attempt to pass off his embrace of George Bush’s policies as bipartisan and new. But change is not one of them.

 

Change is a foreign policy that doesn’t begin and end with a war that should’ve never been authorized and never been waged. I won’t stand here and pretend that there are many good options left in Iraq, but what’s not an option is leaving our troops in that country for the next hundred years – especially at a time when our military is overstretched, our nation is isolated, and nearly every other threat to America is being ignored.

 

We must be as careful getting out of Iraq as we were careless getting in – but start leaving we must. It’s time for Iraqis to take responsibility for their future. It’s time to rebuild our military and give our veterans the care they need and the benefits they deserve when they come home. It’s time to refocus our efforts on al Qaeda’s leadership and Afghanistan, and rally the world against the common threats of the 21st century – terrorism and nuclear weapons; climate change and poverty; genocide and disease. That’s what change is.

 

Change is realizing that meeting today’s threats requires not just our firepower, but the power of our diplomacy – tough, direct diplomacy where the President of the United States isn’t afraid to let any petty dictator know where America stands and what we stand for. We must once again have the courage and conviction to lead the free world. That is the legacy of Roosevelt, and Truman, and Kennedy. That’s what the American people want. That’s what change is.

 

Change is building an economy that rewards not just wealth, but the work and workers who created it. It’s understanding that the struggles facing working families can’t be solved by spending billions of dollars on more tax breaks for big corporations and wealthy CEOs, but by giving a the middle-class a tax break, and investing in our crumbling infrastructure, and transforming how we use energy, and improving our schools, and renewing our commitment to science and innovation. It’s understanding that fiscal responsibility and shared prosperity can go hand-in-hand, as they did when Bill Clinton was President.

 

John McCain has spent a lot of time talking about trips to Iraq in the last few weeks, but maybe if he spent some time taking trips to the cities and towns that have been hardest hit by this economy – cities in Michigan, and Ohio, and right here in Minnesota – he’d understand the kind of change that people are looking for.

 

Maybe if he went to Iowa and met the student who works the night shift after a full day of class and still can’t pay the medical bills for a sister who’s ill, he’d understand that she can’t afford four more years of a health care plan that only takes care of the healthy and wealthy. She needs us to pass health care plan that guarantees insurance to every American who wants it and brings down premiums for every family who needs it. That’s the change we need.

 

Maybe if he went to Pennsylvania and met the man who lost his job but can’t even afford the gas to drive around and look for a new one, he’d understand that we can’t afford four more years of our addiction to oil from dictators. That man needs us to pass an energy policy that works with automakers to raise fuel standards, and makes corporations pay for their pollution, and oil companies invest their record profits in a clean energy future – an energy policy that will create millions of new jobs that pay well and can’t be outsourced. That’s the change we need.

 

And maybe if he spent some time in the schools of South Carolina or St. Paul or where he spoke tonight in New Orleans, he’d understand that we can’t afford to leave the money behind for No Child Left Behind; that we owe it to our children to invest in early childhood education; to recruit an army of new teachers and give them better pay and more support; to finally decide that in this global economy, the chance to get a college education should not be a privilege for the wealthy few, but the birthright of every American. That’s the change we need in America. That’s why I’m running for President.

 

The other side will come here in September and offer a very different set of policies and positions, and that is a debate I look forward to. It is a debate the American people deserve. But what you don’t deserve is another election that’s governed by fear, and innuendo, and division. What you won’t hear from this campaign or this party is the kind of politics that uses religion as a wedge, and patriotism as a bludgeon – that sees our opponents not as competitors to challenge, but enemies to demonize. Because we may call ourselves Democrats and Republicans, but we are Americans first. We are always Americans first.

 

Despite what the good Senator from Arizona said tonight, I have seen people of differing views and opinions find common cause many times during my two decades in public life, and I have brought many together myself. I’ve walked arm-in-arm with community leaders on the South Side of Chicago and watched tensions fade as black, white, and Latino fought together for good jobs and good schools. I’ve sat across the table from law enforcement and civil rights advocates to reform a criminal justice system that sent thirteen innocent people to death row. And I’ve worked with friends in the other party to provide more children with health insurance and more working families with a tax break; to curb the spread of nuclear weapons and ensure that the American people know where their tax dollars are being spent; and to reduce the influence of lobbyists who have all too often set the agenda in Washington.

 

In our country, I have found that this cooperation happens not because we agree on everything, but because behind all the labels and false divisions and categories that define us; beyond all the petty bickering and point-scoring in Washington, Americans are a decent, generous, compassionate people, united by common challenges and common hopes. And every so often, there are moments which call on that fundamental goodness to make this country great again.

 

So it was for that band of patriots who declared in a Philadelphia hall the formation of a more perfect union; and for all those who gave on the fields of Gettysburg and Antietam their last full measure of devotion to save that same union.

 

So it was for the Greatest Generation that conquered fear itself, and liberated a continent from tyranny, and made this country home to untold opportunity and prosperity.

 

So it was for the workers who stood out on the picket lines; the women who shattered glass ceilings; the children who braved a Selma bridge for freedom’s cause.

 

So it has been for every generation that faced down the greatest challenges and the most improbable odds to leave their children a world that’s better, and kinder, and more just.

 

And so it must be for us.

 

America, this is our moment. This is our time. Our time to turn the page on the policies of the past. Our time to bring new energy and new ideas to the challenges we face. Our time to offer a new direction for the country we love.

 

The journey will be difficult. The road will be long. I face this challenge with profound humility, and knowledge of my own limitations. But I also face it with limitless faith in the capacity of the American people. Because if we are willing to work for it, and fight for it, and believe in it, then I am absolutely certain that generations from now, we will be able to look back and tell our children that this was the moment when we began to provide care for the sick and good jobs to the jobless; this was the moment when the rise of the oceans began to slow and our planet began to heal; this was the moment when we ended a war and secured our nation and restored our image as the last, best hope on Earth. This was the moment – this was the time – when we came together to remake this great nation so that it may always reflect our very best selves, and our highest ideals. Thank you, God Bless you, and may God Bless the United States of America.