Looking in the Mirror

Spiritual Revelations for those seeking Humanity in Humans ~~CordieB.

Archive for June 3, 2008

Senator Obama! Change we can Believe In!

 

The journey will be difficult. The road will be long. I face this challenge with profound humility, and knowledge of my own limitations. But I also face it with limitless faith in the capacity of the American people. Because if we are willing to work for it, and fight for it, and believe in it, then I am absolutely certain that generations from now, we will be able to look back and tell our children that this was the moment when we began to provide care for the sick and good jobs to the jobless; this was the moment when the rise of the oceans began to slow and our planet began to heal; this was the moment when we ended a war and secured our nation and restored our image as the last, best hope on Earth. This was the moment – this was the time – when we came together to remake this great nation so that it may always reflect our very best selves, and our highest ideals. Thank you, God Bless you, and may God Bless the United States of America.

Abbreviated Remarks of Senator , Democrat Nominee Barack Obama<

Final Primary Night
Tuesday, June 3rd, 2008
St. Paul, Minnesota

As Prepared for Delivery

Tonight, after fifty-four hard-fought contests, our primary season has finally come to an end.

Sixteen months have passed since we first stood together on the steps of the Old State Capitol in Springfield, Illinois. Thousands of miles have been traveled. Millions of voices have been heard. And because of what you said – because you decided that change must come to Washington; because you believed that this year must be different than all the rest; because you chose to listen not to your doubts or your fears but to your greatest hopes and highest aspirations, tonight we mark the end of one historic journey with the beginning of another – a journey that will bring a new and better day to America. Tonight, I can stand before you and say that I will be the Democratic nominee for President of the United States.

 

I want to thank every American who stood with us over the course of this campaign – through the good days and the bad; from the snows of Cedar Rapids to the sunshine of Sioux Falls. And tonight I also want to thank the men and woman who took this journey with me as fellow candidates for President.

 

At this defining moment for our nation, we should be proud that our party put forth one of the most talented, qualified field of individuals ever to run for this office. I have not just competed with them as rivals, I have learned from them as friends, as public servants, and as patriots who love America and are willing to work tirelessly to make this country better. They are leaders of this party, and leaders that America will turn to for years to come.

 

That is particularly true for the candidate who has traveled further on this journey than anyone else. Senator Hillary Clinton has made history in this campaign not just because she’s a woman who has done what no woman has done before, but because she’s a leader who inspires millions of Americans with her strength, her courage, and her commitment to the causes that brought us here tonight.

 

We’ve certainly had our differences over the last sixteen months. But as someone who’s shared a stage with her many times, I can tell you that what gets Hillary Clinton up in the morning – even in the face of tough odds – is exactly what sent her and Bill Clinton to sign up for their first campaign in Texas all those years ago; what sent her to work at the Children’s Defense Fund and made her fight for health care as First Lady; what led her to the United States Senate and fueled her barrier-breaking campaign for the presidency – an unyielding desire to improve the lives of ordinary Americans, no matter how difficult the fight may be. And you can rest assured that when we finally win the battle for universal health care in this country, she will be central to that victory. When we transform our energy policy and lift our children out of poverty, it will be because she worked to help make it happen. Our party and our country are better off because of her, and I am a better candidate for having had the honor to compete with Hillary Rodham Clinton.

 

There are those who say that this primary has somehow left us weaker and more divided. Well I say that because of this primary, there are millions of Americans who have cast their ballot for the very first time. There are Independents and Republicans who understand that this election isn’t just about the party in charge of Washington, it’s about the need to change Washington. There are young people, and African-Americans, and Latinos, and women of all ages who have voted in numbers that have broken records and inspired a nation.

 

All of you chose to support a candidate you believe in deeply. But at the end of the day, we aren’t the reason you came out and waited in lines that stretched block after block to make your voice heard. You didn’t do that because of me or Senator Clinton or anyone else. You did it because you know in your hearts that at this moment – a moment that will define a generation – we cannot afford to keep doing what we’ve been doing. We owe our children a better future. We owe our country a better future. And for all those who dream of that future tonight, I say – let us begin the work together. Let us unite in common effort to chart a new course for America.

 

In just a few short months, the Republican Party will arrive in St. Paul with a very different agenda. They will come here to nominate John McCain, a man who has served this country heroically. I honor that service, and I respect his many accomplishments, even if he chooses to deny mine. My differences with him are not personal; they are with the policies he has proposed in this campaign.

 

Because while John McCain can legitimately tout moments of independence from his party in the past, such independence has not been the hallmark of his presidential campaign.

 

It’s not change when John McCain decided to stand with George Bush ninety-five percent of the time, as he did in the Senate last year.

 

It’s not change when he offers four more years of Bush economic policies that have failed to create well-paying jobs, or insure our workers, or help Americans afford the skyrocketing cost of college – policies that have lowered the real incomes of the average American family, widened the gap between Wall Street and Main Street, and left our children with a mountain of debt.

 

And it’s not change when he promises to continue a policy in Iraq that asks everything of our brave men and women in uniform and nothing of Iraqi politicians – a policy where all we look for are reasons to stay in Iraq, while we spend billions of dollars a month on a war that isn’t making the American people any safer.

 

So I’ll say this – there are many words to describe John McCain’s attempt to pass off his embrace of George Bush’s policies as bipartisan and new. But change is not one of them.

 

Change is a foreign policy that doesn’t begin and end with a war that should’ve never been authorized and never been waged. I won’t stand here and pretend that there are many good options left in Iraq, but what’s not an option is leaving our troops in that country for the next hundred years – especially at a time when our military is overstretched, our nation is isolated, and nearly every other threat to America is being ignored.

 

We must be as careful getting out of Iraq as we were careless getting in – but start leaving we must. It’s time for Iraqis to take responsibility for their future. It’s time to rebuild our military and give our veterans the care they need and the benefits they deserve when they come home. It’s time to refocus our efforts on al Qaeda’s leadership and Afghanistan, and rally the world against the common threats of the 21st century – terrorism and nuclear weapons; climate change and poverty; genocide and disease. That’s what change is.

 

Change is realizing that meeting today’s threats requires not just our firepower, but the power of our diplomacy – tough, direct diplomacy where the President of the United States isn’t afraid to let any petty dictator know where America stands and what we stand for. We must once again have the courage and conviction to lead the free world. That is the legacy of Roosevelt, and Truman, and Kennedy. That’s what the American people want. That’s what change is.

 

Change is building an economy that rewards not just wealth, but the work and workers who created it. It’s understanding that the struggles facing working families can’t be solved by spending billions of dollars on more tax breaks for big corporations and wealthy CEOs, but by giving a the middle-class a tax break, and investing in our crumbling infrastructure, and transforming how we use energy, and improving our schools, and renewing our commitment to science and innovation. It’s understanding that fiscal responsibility and shared prosperity can go hand-in-hand, as they did when Bill Clinton was President.

 

John McCain has spent a lot of time talking about trips to Iraq in the last few weeks, but maybe if he spent some time taking trips to the cities and towns that have been hardest hit by this economy – cities in Michigan, and Ohio, and right here in Minnesota – he’d understand the kind of change that people are looking for.

 

Maybe if he went to Iowa and met the student who works the night shift after a full day of class and still can’t pay the medical bills for a sister who’s ill, he’d understand that she can’t afford four more years of a health care plan that only takes care of the healthy and wealthy. She needs us to pass health care plan that guarantees insurance to every American who wants it and brings down premiums for every family who needs it. That’s the change we need.

 

Maybe if he went to Pennsylvania and met the man who lost his job but can’t even afford the gas to drive around and look for a new one, he’d understand that we can’t afford four more years of our addiction to oil from dictators. That man needs us to pass an energy policy that works with automakers to raise fuel standards, and makes corporations pay for their pollution, and oil companies invest their record profits in a clean energy future – an energy policy that will create millions of new jobs that pay well and can’t be outsourced. That’s the change we need.

 

And maybe if he spent some time in the schools of South Carolina or St. Paul or where he spoke tonight in New Orleans, he’d understand that we can’t afford to leave the money behind for No Child Left Behind; that we owe it to our children to invest in early childhood education; to recruit an army of new teachers and give them better pay and more support; to finally decide that in this global economy, the chance to get a college education should not be a privilege for the wealthy few, but the birthright of every American. That’s the change we need in America. That’s why I’m running for President.

 

The other side will come here in September and offer a very different set of policies and positions, and that is a debate I look forward to. It is a debate the American people deserve. But what you don’t deserve is another election that’s governed by fear, and innuendo, and division. What you won’t hear from this campaign or this party is the kind of politics that uses religion as a wedge, and patriotism as a bludgeon – that sees our opponents not as competitors to challenge, but enemies to demonize. Because we may call ourselves Democrats and Republicans, but we are Americans first. We are always Americans first.

 

Despite what the good Senator from Arizona said tonight, I have seen people of differing views and opinions find common cause many times during my two decades in public life, and I have brought many together myself. I’ve walked arm-in-arm with community leaders on the South Side of Chicago and watched tensions fade as black, white, and Latino fought together for good jobs and good schools. I’ve sat across the table from law enforcement and civil rights advocates to reform a criminal justice system that sent thirteen innocent people to death row. And I’ve worked with friends in the other party to provide more children with health insurance and more working families with a tax break; to curb the spread of nuclear weapons and ensure that the American people know where their tax dollars are being spent; and to reduce the influence of lobbyists who have all too often set the agenda in Washington.

 

In our country, I have found that this cooperation happens not because we agree on everything, but because behind all the labels and false divisions and categories that define us; beyond all the petty bickering and point-scoring in Washington, Americans are a decent, generous, compassionate people, united by common challenges and common hopes. And every so often, there are moments which call on that fundamental goodness to make this country great again.

 

So it was for that band of patriots who declared in a Philadelphia hall the formation of a more perfect union; and for all those who gave on the fields of Gettysburg and Antietam their last full measure of devotion to save that same union.

 

So it was for the Greatest Generation that conquered fear itself, and liberated a continent from tyranny, and made this country home to untold opportunity and prosperity.

 

So it was for the workers who stood out on the picket lines; the women who shattered glass ceilings; the children who braved a Selma bridge for freedom’s cause.

 

So it has been for every generation that faced down the greatest challenges and the most improbable odds to leave their children a world that’s better, and kinder, and more just.

 

And so it must be for us.

 

America, this is our moment. This is our time. Our time to turn the page on the policies of the past. Our time to bring new energy and new ideas to the challenges we face. Our time to offer a new direction for the country we love.

 

The journey will be difficult. The road will be long. I face this challenge with profound humility, and knowledge of my own limitations. But I also face it with limitless faith in the capacity of the American people. Because if we are willing to work for it, and fight for it, and believe in it, then I am absolutely certain that generations from now, we will be able to look back and tell our children that this was the moment when we began to provide care for the sick and good jobs to the jobless; this was the moment when the rise of the oceans began to slow and our planet began to heal; this was the moment when we ended a war and secured our nation and restored our image as the last, best hope on Earth. This was the moment – this was the time – when we came together to remake this great nation so that it may always reflect our very best selves, and our highest ideals. Thank you, God Bless you, and may God Bless the United States of America.

We all have our own demons to conquer!

There are some people who are so uprightious and heavenly bound that they are truly no earthly good.  Some people spend so much energy talking about other’s so-called defects that you would think they had never made mistakes, never lied, never cheated, alway paid every bill on time, always gave 100 percent at work, always cleaned their houses, never smoked a joint, never had a beer–the list goes on.  But if we look into these peoples closets, we would find that they have experienced many of the same issues that they spend 90 percent of their time talking, complaining, gossiping, and shaking their heads about. 

Now, normally, I can ignore all these rants and hypocracies; but today – I’m just fed up from the head up.  These people seem to get a joy out of others miseries and mistakes in life.  And then, the phase that just eats me up is “I would never . . . . ”  I find those I would never people usually are suffering from selected amnesia or those same demons for which they never would are sure to come into existence one day.

Now, I’m not talking about people who talk every now and then, or comment on news worthy events.  No I’m talking about the vicious gossipers who smile in your face–smile in everyone’s face–only to start the down talking the moment you leave the room or are off the phone.  I’m talking about those folks who never have anything good to say about anyone, but can always point out how someone is headed down the wrong path or going to hell in a hay basket.  What the hell is hell in a hay basket? 

I just feel that if these so called “good people” would extend half of the energy they use talking about other’s misdeeds helping peole overcome their problems, then the world would be a far better place. 

We all have our own demons to conquer.  All of us grow at different rates; and we all learn some things faster than other things.  We don’t all even want the same things others want.  We don’t have the same belief’s as everyone else.  These unique traits make us human.  Here’s some food for thought . . .

Today, in a town near you, there is an upstanding deacon of the church who is a child molester – yet he preaches being upright all the time.

Today, in a town near you, there is a gay basher who loves to look at gay porn and practices homosexuality on the down low.  (I know one personally).

Today, in a town near you, there is a Christian who would never dream of helping a homeless man or woman – unless of course that person came inside of the church.

Today, in a town near you, there is a woman who constantly talks about the youth of today and how “bad and stupid they are.”  This same woman failed to raise her own children because she gave birth to her first one at 14. 

Today, in a town near your, there is a man who constantly accuses his wife of flirting; yet he has encountered numerous affairs.

Today, in a town near you, there is an upstanding citizen, who will be arrested for domestic abuse. 

Today, in a town near you, there is a teenager who is contemplating suicide because of mean, irresponsible gossip.

We should always remember the golden rule; do unto others as we would have them do unto us.  Because when we don’t, those demons that we never could imagine facing, might just come to bite us!  

Peace, Light and Love,

CordieB.

 

What I have learned (sometimes, the hard way), but not all that I have learned

I’ve always enjoyed reading lessons learned in life.  Below is a list of “What I I have Learned” quotes that I’ve collected and a few of my own.  I have learned that … you can always learn something new.   Also, I have learned that I can learn from anyone, and everyone has knowledge to share.   That being said, please add a “What I have Learned” quote to this list.   . . .

I’ve learned –
that you cannot make someone love you.
All you can do is
be someone who can be loved.
The rest is up to them.

I’ve learned –
that no matter how much I care,
some people just don’t care back.

I’ve learned –
that it takes years to build up trust,
and only seconds to destroy it.

I’ve learned –
that it’s not what you have in your life
but who you have in your life that counts.

I’ve learned –
that you can get by on charm
for about fifteen minutes.
After that, you’d better know something.
I’ve learned –
that you shouldn’t compare
yourself to the best others can do,
but to the best you can do.

I’ve learned –
that it’s not what happens to people
that’s important. It’s what they do about it.

I’ve learned –
that you can do something in an instant
that will give you heartache for life.

I’ve learned –
that no matter how thin you slice it,
there are always two sides.

I’ve learned –
that it’s taking me a long time
to become the person I want to be

I’ve learned –
that it’s a lot easier
to react than it is to think.

I’ve learned –
that you should always leave
loved ones with loving words.
It may be the last time you see them.

I’ve learned –
that you can keep going
long after you think you can’t.

I’ve learned –
that we are responsible for what we do,
no matter how we feel.

I’ve learned –
that either you control your attitude
or it controls you.

I’ve learned –
that regardless of how hot and steamy
a relationship is at first,
the passion fades and there had better be
something else to take its place.

I’ve learned –
that heroes are the people
who do what has to be done
when it needs to be done,
regardless of the consequences.

I’ve learned –
that learning to forgive takes practice.

I’ve learned –
that there are people who love you dearly,
but just don’t know how to show it.

I’ve learned –
that money is a lousy way of keeping score.

I’ve learned –
that my best friend and I can do anything
or nothing and have the best time.

I’ve learned –
that sometimes the people you expect
to kick you when you’re down
will be the ones to help you get back up.

I’ve learned –
that sometimes when I’m angry
I have the right to be angry,
but that doesn’t give me
the right to be cruel.

I’ve learned –
that true friendship continues to grow,
even over the longest distance.
Same goes for true love.

I’ve learned –
that just because someone
doesn’t love you the way you want
them to, it doesn’t mean they don’t
love you with all they have.

I’ve learned –
that maturity has more to do with
what types of experiences you’ve had
and what you’ve learned from them
and less to do with how many
birthdays you’ve celebrated..

I’ve learned –
that you should never tell a child
their dreams are unlikely or outlandish.
Few things are more humiliating, and what
a tragedy it would if they believed it..

I’ve learned –
that your family won’t always
be there for you. It may seem funny,
but people you aren’t related to
can take care of you and love you
and teach you to trust people again.
Families aren’t biological..

I’ve learned –
that no matter how good a friend is,
they’re going to hurt you
every once in a while
and you must forgive them for that.

I’ve learned –
that it isn’t always enough
to be forgiven by others.
Sometimes you have to learn
to forgive yourself.

I’ve learned –
that no matter how bad
your heart is broken
the world doesn’t stop for your grief.

I’ve learned –
that our background and circumstances
may have influenced who we are,
but we are responsible for who we become.

I’ve learned –
that sometimes when my friends fight,
I’m forced to choose sides
even when I don’t want to.

I’ve learned –
that just because two people argue,
it doesn’t mean they don’t love each other
And just because they don’t argue,
it doesn’t mean they do.

I’ve learned –
that sometimes you have to put
the individual ahead of their actions.

I’ve learned –
that we don’t have to change friends
if we understand that friends change.

I’ve learned –
that you shouldn’t be so
eager to find out a secret.
It could change your life forever.

I’ve learned –
that two people can look
at the exact same thing
and see something totally different.

I’ve learned –
that no matter how you try to protect
your children, they will eventually get hurt
and you will hurt in the process.

I’ve learned –
that there are many ways of falling
and staying in love.

I’ve learned –
that no matter the consequences,
those who are honest with themselves
get farther in life.

I’ve learned –
that no matter how many friends
you have, if you are their pillar
you will feel lonely and lost
at the times you need them most.

I’ve learned –
that your life can be changed
in a matter of hours
by people who don’t even know you.

I’ve learned –
that even when you think
you have no more to give,
when a friend cries out to you,
you will find the strength to help.

I’ve learned –
that writing, as well as talking,
can ease emotional pains.

I’ve learned –
that the paradigm we live in
is not all that is offered to us.

I’ve learned –
that credentials on the wall
do not make you a decent human being.

I’ve learned –
that the people you care most about in life
are taken from you too soon.

I’ve learned –
that although the word “love”
can have many different meanings,
it loses value when overly used.

I’ve learned –
that it’s hard to determine
where to draw the line
between being nice and
not hurting people’s feelings
and standing up for what you believe.

I’ve Learned. . .The badness of a movie is directly proportional to the number of
    helicopters in it.

I’ve Learned. . .Nobody is normal.

I’ve Learned. . .You will never find anybody who can give you a clear and compelling reason why we observe daylight-saving time.

I’ve Learned. . .People who feel the need to tell you that they have an excellent sense of humor are telling you that they have no sense of humor.

I’ve Learned. . .The most valuable function performed by the federal government is entertainment.

I’ve Learned. . .You should never say anything to a woman that even remotely suggests you think she’s pregnant unless you can see an actual baby emerging from her at that moment.

I’ve Learned. . .A penny saved is worthless.

I’ve Learned. . .The most powerful force in the universe is gossip.

I’ve Learned. . .The one thing that unites all human beings, regardless of age, gender, religion, economic status, or ethnic background, is that, deep down  inside, we all believe that we are above-average drivers.

I’ve Learned. . .There comes a time when you should stop expecting other people to make a big deal about your birthday. That time is age 11.

I’ve Learned. . .There is a very fine line between “hobby” and “mental illness.”

I’ve Learned. . .People who want to share their religious views with you almost never want you to share yours with them.

I’ve Learned. . .A person who is nice to you, but rude to the waiter, is not a nice person.

I’ve Learned. . .No matter what happens, somebody will find a way to take it too seriously.

I’ve Learned. . .When trouble arises and things look bad, there is always one individual who perceives a solution and is willing to take command. Very often,  that individual is crazy.

I’ve Learned. . .Your friends love you anyway.

I’ve Learned. . .Nobody cares if you can’t dance well. Just get up and dance.

I have Learned that . . .The best vision is not foresight or hindsight, but insight.

I’ve Learned to . . Live as if you will die today, and at the same time, Live as if you will live forever. What you do, and do not do, has infinite effects through infinity.

I’ve Learned . . . With every passing year I am more
convinced than ever of the truth of the popular Christian poem: “Only one life, ‘twil soon be past. Only
what’s done for Christ will last.”

I’ve learned….
That life is like a roll of toilet paper. The closer it gets to the end, the faster it goes.

I’ve learned….
That we should be glad God doesn’t give us everything we ask for.

I’ve learned….
That money doesn’t buy class.

I’ve learned….
That it’s those small daily happenings that make life so spectacular.

I’ve learned…
That under everyone’s hard shell is someone who wants to be appreciated and loved.

I’ve learned….
That the Lord didn’t do it all in one day. What makes me think I can?

I’ve learned….
That to ignore the facts does not change the facts.

I’ve learned….
That when you plan to get even with someone, you are only letting that person continue to hurt you.

I’ve learned….
That love, not time, heals all wounds.

I’ve learned….
That the easiest way for me to grow as a person is to surround myself with people smarter than I am.

I’ve learned….
That everyone you meet deserves to be greeted with a smile.

I’ve learned….
That there’s nothing sweeter than sleeping with your babies and feeling their breath on your cheeks.

I’ve learned…. That no one is perfect until you fall in love with them.

I’ve learned….
That life is tough, but I’m tougher.
I’ve learned….
That opportunities are never lost; someone will take the ones you miss.

I’ve learned….
That when you harbor bitterness, happiness will dock elsewhere.

I’ve learned….
That I wish I could have told my Mom that I love her one more time before she passed away.

I’ve learned….
That one should keep his words both soft and tender, because tomorrow he may have to eat them.

I’ve learned….
That a smile is an inexpensive way to improve your looks.

I’ve learned….
That I can’t choose how I feel, but I can choose what I do about it.

I’ve learned….
That when your newly born grandchild holds your little finger in his little fist, that you’re hooked for life.

I’ve learned….
That everyone wants to live on top of the mountain, but all the happiness and growth occurs while you’re climbing it.

I’ve learned …
That it is best to give advice in only two circumstances; when it is requested and when it is a life-threatening situation.

I’ve learned….
That the less time I have to work with, the more things I get done.

I’ve learned. . To not get into my children’s arguments with their friends.  The children will make up next day, but we parents will stay angry with each other for eternity.